Happy Pride!

Rainbow flag

Pride month might be coming to an end, but we have a great selection of LGBTQIA+ books for you to read year round!

There are so many great works of LGBTQIA+ literature out there. While we have tried to highlight a diverse range of experience, this list is not exhaustive. Staff have sent in their favorites and we hope they will end up on your favorites list too! If you would like a list of books on a particular topic, you can request one through our Custom Book List form.

Fiction

Stray City by Chelsey Johnson – “Johnson uses the kind of world-building energy often reserved for fantasy to invite readers into a subcultural moment within our own world. Every character seemed to walk off the page — real, warm, funny, and imperfect. I can see them in my mind’s eye, off living their lives in 2018. I canceled my plans the day I got my hands on a copy, and I’ve never regretted it. This is a book that recognizes the existence of trauma, but is far more interested in how queer characters move towards fulfillment and joy. I needed that.”

No One Can Pronounce My Name by Rakesh Satyel – “This novel is charmingly heartfelt, with a wonderfully introspective exploration of identity, the immigrant experience, and friendship. It would make a great sitcom!”

Graphic Novels for Adults

My Favorite Thing Is Monsters: Volume I by Emil Ferris – “This is one of the most beautiful books I’ve ever picked up, drawn entirely in ballpoint pen. Karen is an unforgettable main character — precocious and creative, with a rich internal life. Her imagination is vibrant, her curiosity is insatiable, and she may feel monstrous but her heart is divine. I can’t wait for volume 2 to come out in 2019.”

Bingo Love by Tee Franklin – “In 1963, a game of bingo brings together Hazel Johnson and Mari McCray, but thanks to society’s obstacles, the two are separated, leaving empty spaces within themselves bigger than any you’d find on a bingo card. This black queer romance is unique in that it highlights a romance in the golden years of life, but will appeal to teens and adults alike with its vibrant colorful style and message of inclusion. Pick up this title if you want a quick read about second chances which will move you to happy tears.”

Taproot: A Story About a Gardener and a Ghost by Keezy Young – “I picked this up because the art looked amazing, but within a few pages I had fallen completely in love with the characters. The story is charming and sweet and just barely spooky!”

Memoir

Party of One: A Memoir in 21 Songs by Dave Holmes – “If only this audiobook would have played the tracklist of songs mentioned throughout it at the end of the book, I would have fully transported back to my youth (insert 80’s and 90’s references here)! I usually listen while driving down the road, and it felt like Dave (yes, we are on a first name basis now!) was sitting in my car and telling me stories about his life….that were good and entertaining, and relatable for anyone! If you’re looking at breaking the ice into a memoir, need a short upbeat audiobook to break up your morning or afternoon commute, or just want a ‘friend’ to tell you some stories, this is the audiobook for you!”

We Are Never Meeting In Real Life by Samantha Irby – “I was laugh-crying while listening to this on my way to work. Irby is hilariously honest, and her narration of the audiobook is amazing!”

Young Adult Fiction

The Pros of Cons by Alison Cherry – “Light and fun, but with some depth and actual character-building. Three teen girls, attending three different conventions at the same center, cross paths. Healthy girl friendships, features a faceted lesbian relationship, positive portrayal of gender-neutral pronouns, and a lot of fandom appeal!”

The Inexplicable Logic of My Life by Benjamin Alire Sáenz – “I fell in love with this author after reading Dante and Aristotle Discover the Secrets of the Universe. This new novel is just as charming. Once again Sáenz writes about family, friendship, and identity in a way that is truly insightful.”

Labyrinth Lost by Zoraida Cordova – “When Alex tries to deny her magical powers chaos breaks loose. She then must journey to figure out who she is and how to accept herself.”

Young Adult Graphic Novels

As the Crow Flies by Melanie Gillman – “Pick up As the Crow Flies if you’re in the mood for a story in which two teens question — and plan to subvert — the status quo. I liked it for the painfully real portrayal of teens at an excursion camp who slowly grow to understand each other.”

DRAMA by Raina Telgemeier – “Raina Telgemeier’s YA graphic novel DRAMA displays the comedy and stress of putting on a stage play, and adroitly features gay characters and their teen angst as friends of the main character. Among YALSA’s 2015 Top Ten Graphic Novels for Teens, its strength is its innocence – there’s no sex, just characters being openly gay-hurray!”

Princess Princess Ever After by Katie O’Neill – “Fairytales are my favorite, so I was really excited to find this graphic novel. There is adventure, an ‘evil’ queen, and the most darling love story. It is just so charming!”

The Pants Project by Cat Clarke – “Middle schoolers are all trying to figure themselves out, and will relate to Liv’s struggles. Serious issues are addressed in a kind way in this hopeful, upbeat story that celebrates differences.”

Middle Grade Novels

Ivy Aberdeen’s Letter to the World by Ashley Herring Blake – “First crushes are always hard, especially when you are still figuring out which gender you might be attracted to. Ashley Herring Blake does an excellent job depicting what it is like to be young and figuring things out.”

Hurricane Child by Kheryn Callender – “Callender captures what it means to be a child discovering their identity in the Caribbean. This might be written for a younger audience, but the beauty of the setting and a wonderful dose of magical realism make this novel enjoyable for anyone.”

George by Alex Gino – “Great friendship book focusing on fourth graders. Honest, wise, poignant with the truest message of all – ‘be who you are’ – even if it means summoning courage with the support of your best friend to be a tough cookie.”

Picture Books

My Princess Boy by Cheryl Kilodavis – “The message in this book of embracing your gender identity and accepting those who are different is beautifully done. I would recommend it for anyone.”

This Day in June by Gayle E. Pittman – “This book is a wonderful celebration of PRIDE and all that it stands for! It will make you smile to read it.”

What are your favorite books to celebrate Pride Month?